How To Keep Your Family Safe During The Coronavirus Pandemic

Coronavirus

Prevent Getting Sick From The Coronavirus

You can take action to protect yourself and others during a COVID-19 outbreak.

  • The coronavirus is supposed to spread mainly from person-to-person.
  • The most effective way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to the virus.
  • Know there’s presently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

How Coronavirus Spreads

1. Person-To-Person Spread

The most common way of transmission is supposed to spread person-to-person.  Among people who are in close contact with each other (within around 6 feet).

The respiratory droplets that come out when an infected individual sneezes or coughs.  These droplets can enter into the mouths or noses of individuals who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

2. Can Someone Spread The Virus Without Being Ill?

People are considered to be contagious when they’re most symptomatic (the sickest).  Some spread may be possible before folks show symptoms.

There have been reports of this occurring with new coronavirus, but this isn’t considered to be the primary way that the virus spreads.

3. Spread From Contact With Contaminated Items Or surfaces

It can be possible that an individual could get COVID-19 by touching an object or surface that contains the virus and then touching their own nose, mouth, or perhaps their eyes, but this isn’t considered to be the primary way of spreading the virus.

How Easily The Virus Spreads?

How easily a virus spreads from one person to another can differ. Some viruses are highly contagious (spread easily), such as measles, while other viruses don’t spread as easily. Another factor is if the spread is sustained, spreading without stopping.

The virus, which causes COVID-19, appears to be spreading quickly and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in certain affected geographical areas.  Community spread means individuals are infected with the virus in a place, including some who aren’t sure how or where they became contaminated.

Protect Yourself By Understanding How COVID-19 Spreads

  • There’s currently no vaccine produced to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
  • The most effective way to avoid disease is to avoid being exposed to the virus.
  • The virus is supposed to spread mainly from person-to-person.
  • Between individuals that are in close contact with each other (within around 6 feet).
  • Through respiratory droplets thrown when an infected individual sneezes or coughs.
  • These droplets can enter into the mouths or noses of individuals that are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

Take Steps To Protect Yourself

1. Clean Your Hands Frequently

  • Wash your hands repeatedly with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds, mainly when you’re at a public area or after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing.
  • If water and soap aren’t readily available, use a hand sanitizer that is made up of at least 60% alcohol. Wash all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Do not touch your nose, mouth, and eyes with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact

2. Avoid Close Contact With Sick People

Set distance between yourself and others if COVID-19 is spreading in your community. This is particularly important for men and women that are at high risk of becoming ill with the coronavirus.

3. Take Steps To Protect Others

  • Stay home if you are sick with the coronavirus.
  • Stay home if you’re sick, except for medical care. Learn what to do if you’re sick.

4. Cover Coughs And Sneezes

Cover your nose and mouth using a tissue or use the inside of your elbow when you cough or sneeze.

5. Throw Used Tissues In The Garbage

Rapidly wash your hands with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds. Clean your hands with a hand sanitizer if soap and water aren’t readily available.

6. Wear a Face Mask Or Not Wear One?

  • If you’re sick: You should wear a face mask whenever you’re around other people (e.g., sharing a vehicle or room) and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you’re unable to put on a face mask (as an instance, as it causes difficulty breathing), then you ought to do your best to cover your coughs and sneezes. Individuals that are caring for you should wear a face mask if they enter your room.
  • If you’re NOT sick: you don’t have to wear a face mask unless you’re caring for someone who’s sick (and they’re unable to wear a face mask). Face masks are in limited supply, and they need to be stored for the medical community.
  • CDC now suggests that wearing a homemade face covering is better than nothing, this will keep the public from touching their faces.  Also, if you don’t know that you have become infected or are asymptomatic wearing a facemask or face covering will help slow down the spread of the virus.

7. Clean And Disinfect

  • Clean and disinfect often touched surfaces every day, such as tables, doorknobs, countertops, light switches, handles, desks, keyboards, telephones, faucets, toilets, and sinks.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use soap or detergent and water before disinfection.

To Disinfect:

Most popular EPA-registered home disinfectants will be effective. Use disinfectants suitable for the surface.

Options include:

  • Diluting your household bleach.

To create a bleach solution, combine:

4 tsp bleach per quart of water

OR

5 tbsp bleach per gallon of water

Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for application and appropriate ventilation. Check to assure the product is not past its expiration date. Never combine household bleach with ammonia or another cleanser.

  • Alcohol Solutions

Ensure the solution has at least 70% alcohol.

  • Other Common EPA-registered Home Disinfectants.

Items with EPA-approved emerging viral pathogens claims are supposed to work against COVID-19 based on information for more difficult to kill viruses. Follow the manufacturer’s directions for all cleaning and disinfection products (e.g., concentration, application procedure, and contact time, etc.).

Detailed Disinfection Advice For Covid-19

As part of your daily prevention activities, clean and disinfect often touched surfaces and objects, for example, countertops, tables, light switches, doorknobs, and cupboard handles.

Clean

Clean surfaces with water and soap. Practice the routine cleaning of surfaces touched frequently.

High touch surfaces include: tables, doorknobs, keyboards, light switches, handles, countertops, desks, telephones, sinks, toilets, faucets, etc..

Disinfect

  • Clean the place or thing with soap and water or a different detergent if it’s dirty. Use a household disinfectant.
  • Recommend use of EPA-registered household disinfectant.
  • Follow the guidelines on the label to ensure the safe and efficient use of the goods.

Many Products Advocate:

  • Maintaining surface moist for some time (see product label)
  • Precautions like wearing gloves and ensuring you have proper ventilation during the use of the product.
  • Diluted household bleach alternatives may also be used if appropriate for the surface. Check to make sure the product is not past its expiration date. Unexpired home bleach will be work effectively against coronaviruses when accurately diluted.
  • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for application and appropriate ventilation. Never mix household with ammonia or another cleanser.
  • Pour the solution on the surface and keep it for at least 1 minute

To create a bleach solution, combine:

4 tsp bleach per quart of water

OR

5 tbsp (1/3rd cup) bleach per gallon of water

 

For Delicate Surfaces Like Carpeted Floor, Rugs, And Curtains

Clean the surface with water and soap or with cleaners appropriate to be used on those surfaces.

Launder items according to the manufacturer’s guidelines. Use the warmest water temperature setting and dry clothes thoroughly.

OR

Disinfect with an EPA-registered household disinfectant. These disinfectants meet with the EPA’s standards to be used against COVID-19.

Electronics

For electronic equipment, like tablets, touch screens, keyboards, and remote controls.

  • Consider putting a wipeable cover on electronics
  • Follow manufacturer’s instruction for cleaning and disinfecting
  • If no advice, use alcohol-based sprays or wipes containing at least 70% alcohol. Dry surface completely. Do not spray directly onto the electronic device, spray the micro-fiber cloth or a lint-free cloth then use that to wipe your electronics.

Laundry

For clothing, towels, linens and other items

  • Wear disposable gloves.
  • Wash hands with soap and water once you remove the gloves.
  • Don’t shake dirty laundry.
  • Launder items according to the manufacturer’s directions. Use the warmest water temperature setting and dry clothes thoroughly.
  • Dirty laundry from the ill person can be washed with other individual’s things.
  • Clean and sanitize clothes hampers based on advice above for surfaces.

Clean Hands Frequently

Wash your hands often with water and soap for a minimum of 20 seconds.

Always wash your hands promptly after removing gloves and after contact with an ill person.

Hand sanitizer: If soap and water aren’t readily available and hands aren’t visibly dirty, use a hand sanitizer that is made up of at least 60% alcohol. If hands are visibly dirty, wash hands with water and soap.

Additional important times to wash hands include:

  • After blowing one’s nose, sneezing, or coughing,
  • After using the restroom
  • Before preparing or eating food
  • After contact with pets or animals
  • Before and after giving routine care for another person who needs attention (e.g., a kid )
  • Avoid touching your nose, eyes, and mouth with unwashed hands.

When Someone is Sick With The Coronavirus

Bedroom and Bathroom

  • Keep separate bedroom and bathroom for the sick people (if possible)
  • The ill person should remain separated from other folks in the house (as much as you can ).
  • When you’ve another bedroom and toilet: Reduce cleaning to as-needed (e.g., soiled surfaces and items ) to limit the amount of contact with the ill person.
  • Caregivers can offer private cleaning supplies to the ill person (if appropriate). Supplies include paper towels, tissues, cleaners, and disinfectants.
  • If the bathroom is shared: Clean and disinfect after each use by the ill person. If this isn’t feasible, the caregiver should wait before disinfecting and cleaning.

Food

  • Stay split: The ill person should eat (or be fed) in their room if possible.
  • Wash utensils and dishes with gloves and warm water: Manage any non-disposable used food service items with gloves and wash with warm water or in a dishwasher.
  • Clean hands after touching used food service items.

Trash

Special, lined garbage can: When possible, assign a lined trash can for the ailing individual. Use gloves when taking out garbage bags, and managing and disposing of garbage. Wash hands afterward.

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